Title That Blasted Novella! Contest

Typing out “That Still Untitled Selwick Christmas Novella” several times a day is the manual equivalent of dealing with Peter Piper and his pickled peppers. Amusing the first few times, but….

Since the plan is to post the entire story permanently on the website, to be made available through the Diversions page, it needs a title. A title that does not have “untitled” in the title.

As my head is off in Pink VII land already, I appeal to you for title aid. For the next few days, I’ll be taking suggestions for the title of That Still… I don’t have to type it all out again, do I?

Just post your suggestions in the comments area below. The contest will run all week, and you can enter as many titles as you like. On Saturday, I’ll post the winner and runners-up– unless I find myself incapable of deciding, in which case, I’ll narrow the field to my top five and open the rest up to popular vote.

The winner will get to provide the title for the story and will receive a signed copy of The Temptation of the Night Jasmine. Runners-up get signed bookplates.

If you need to refresh your memory of the story, just click here to start with the Prologue….

112 Comments

  1. Jessica S on January 26, 2009 at 12:34 am

    I was thinking “The Mistletoe Conspiracy” or “The Treachery of the New-Fallen Snow”

    I have to think some more but at least I’ve put a couple of tries in before everyone else!

  2. Rebecca W on January 26, 2009 at 1:23 am

    Okay, so the first one that I thought of off the top of my head is:

    “Oh What Fun It Is To Spy!”
    (You can add “In A One Horse Open Sleigh” to the title if you so desire! :D)

    Don’t worry, I’m sure I’ll be back with others during the week!

  3. Kayse on January 26, 2009 at 1:27 am

    What about “the Union of the Holly and the Ivy,” just to give Richard and Amy some holiday-themed botanical aliases?

    When I was trying to think of a good one, I kept thinking “‘Tis the Season for Treason,” in honor of Deirdre… dumb, but amusing, so I thought I’d throw that out there too.

  4. Magdalena on January 26, 2009 at 3:37 am

    Beneath the Mistletoe

  5. Eve on January 26, 2009 at 6:51 am

    Errrr…

    “‘Tis the Season for Spying” ???

    Ok, lame, but it’s late/early. πŸ™‚

  6. Eve on January 26, 2009 at 6:55 am

    Erm, I just realized that Kayse pretty much summed up the “‘Tis the Season…” theme already, so I will enter another idea….

    “Old Habits Die Hard”

    Eh, maybe I’ll think of something better….

  7. Courtney on January 26, 2009 at 8:28 am

    The Return of the Gold Narcissus

    Gold, because I’m sure Deirdre would insist on something extravagant as her code name, and Narcissus, because it just suits her so well! πŸ˜‰

  8. Stephanie on January 26, 2009 at 9:24 am

    I was thinking along the same lines as Kayse and keeping with the theme of the other novels.

    “The Festivities of The Holly and The Ivy”

  9. kiley on January 26, 2009 at 9:29 am

    I liked A Very Selwick Christmas. You used it as the news post title and it stuck, for me any ways and this type of thing would happen to the Selwicks on Christmas.

  10. Lee on January 26, 2009 at 9:41 am

    The Treacherous Ivy at Uppington house

  11. Susan on January 26, 2009 at 10:11 am

    The Thorn of the White Mistletoe.

    In trying to keep with the patterns of the other book titles. (And I also liked A Very Selwick Christmas)

  12. Chris B. on January 26, 2009 at 10:11 am

    “Misadventure Amidst the Mistletoe”
    (obvious Christmas reference) OR

    “Mischief Amidst the Mistletoe”
    (simple variation) OR

    “The Intrigue of the Christmas Orchid”
    (Deirdre’s lavender gown reminded me of an orchid, or perhaps an iris) OR

    “The Resolution of the Purple Gentian”
    (I thought Richard deserved a title, and I liked the multiple meanings of “resolution” as strength, a decision and reference to New Year’s)

  13. Jen on January 26, 2009 at 10:23 am

    Maybe I was the only one who kept catching references within the story…but how about

    “The Revenge of the Mince Meat Pie”

    It seems like that pie popped up all over the place: on Lady Uppington’s dress, in Amy’s thoughts…

    And I am sure Amy would gain a certain amount of satisfaction in comparing Richard’s old flame to a pie.

  14. Laura on January 26, 2009 at 11:21 am

    Going for continuity with the other titles… Maybe it’s just silly, but how about
    “The Folly of the Mistletoe Mata-Hari”

  15. Robyn on January 26, 2009 at 12:13 pm

    Personally I liked the “A very Selwick Christmas” and thinks it fits perfectly but here are a few others:
    “A very Selwick Christmas Mayhem”
    or
    “Mistletoe and Mince Pie Christmas”
    or
    “Anarchy of the Mistletoe”

  16. Victoria on January 26, 2009 at 12:20 pm

    Flower Frost
    Mistletoe & Mayhem

  17. Bess on January 26, 2009 at 12:45 pm

    Simple is good – “A Very Selwick Christmas”, though “The Misunderstood Mistloe” could also work and stay with the plant titles.

    Lovely story. It’s good to see Richard and Amy up close again.

  18. Wendy on January 26, 2009 at 12:59 pm

    “The Intrique of Evergreen on a Selwick Christmas”

  19. Joanna on January 26, 2009 at 1:24 pm

    The Hidden Agenda of the Christmas Holly

  20. MP on January 26, 2009 at 1:41 pm

    I also liked “A Very Selwick Christmas”. Sometimes one’s first instinct is one’s best…

  21. Morgan on January 26, 2009 at 2:26 pm

    I too think it needs to stay along the botanical line, (although on second thought, “Emerald Ring” didn’t…)

    “The Return of the Holly and the Ivy” (with the maid being the poking, scratching holly and Dierdre being the twisting, strangling ivy.)

    “The Misadventure of the Holly and the Ivy” referring to the shenanigans of Richard and Amy.

    or
    “The Misunderstanding of the Holly and the Ivy” again referring to Richard and Amy.

  22. Chloe on January 26, 2009 at 2:48 pm

    I was thinking that the title should have a reference to a flower and also thought that the words should roll of the tongue. I find these words old fashioned and in fitting with the descriptive words you use in your stories.
    So here goes: “Mistletoe,Mayhap and Mayhem with the Selwick’s.” or “Mayhem,Mishaps and Mistletoe at the Selwick’s.” The words could be arranged in any order.

    By the way I must tell you how I much I appreciate and enjoy your books. I have an illness (which I won’t go into detail about) but reading your books inspires me. They are so thought provoking and interesting. I love reading about history in Europe and as a teenager greatly enjoy the romance evoked in your novels.
    I apologize for writing so much but I have wanted to write to you for such a long time.
    Thank you again and know that I love your work. πŸ™‚

  23. Chloe on January 26, 2009 at 2:51 pm

    I meant to write roll off the tongue.

  24. alexandria on January 26, 2009 at 2:53 pm

    Mistletoe,Mince Pie, and Menace

  25. Kristen on January 26, 2009 at 2:53 pm

    It may just be me, but I don’t like titles that need to be explained…it’s like a joke that has to be expalined…but then again what have I come up with??

  26. alexandria on January 26, 2009 at 2:54 pm

    The Secret History of Holly and Ivy.

  27. Diane on January 26, 2009 at 3:02 pm

    I really enjoyed “that blasted novella”! I’m looking forward to more of them in the future (she says hopefully).

    My suggestions as to the title of the heretofore-mentioned novella:

    1) The Kiss of the Mistletoe

    2) The Genesis of the Holly and the Ivy
    (talking about Richard and Amy beginning their spying team) or

    3) The Holly and the Ivy is Full Well Grown (a play on the lyrics of the song)

    Thanks again for the novella, Lauren.

  28. Diana on January 26, 2009 at 4:32 pm

    The Feint of the Mistletoe

  29. Camille la Flamme on January 26, 2009 at 4:36 pm

    “The Pink Carnation’s Lexicon of Christmas Carols,” in reference to the Lexicon of frivolous terms owned by Henrietta. Or, simply “The Holly and the Ivy.”

  30. Alex on January 26, 2009 at 4:41 pm

    The Betrayal of the Christmas Goose

  31. Rebecca C on January 26, 2009 at 4:59 pm

    I like Melee Under the Mistletoe

  32. Cho on January 26, 2009 at 5:13 pm

    I personally liked A Very Selwick Christmas, and my other suggestion is simply The Holly and the Ivy.

  33. Diana on January 26, 2009 at 5:13 pm

    The Allure of the Mistletoe

  34. Jess G. on January 26, 2009 at 5:33 pm

    The Revenge of the Mistletoe

    Maybe not the most creative, but I like the mistletoe line of thinking.
    Like Deirdre, Mistletoe is pretty, but also poisonous.

  35. Amy on January 26, 2009 at 6:43 pm

    I also liked a Very Selwick Christmas,however…
    I also like something along the lines of The Exile of the Purple Gentian. This maybe strange since its isn’t Christmas-sy, but the book is about Richard’s regret about leaving espionage. maybe The Yuletide Exile of the Purple Gentian. ooh along the lines of the songs above how about The Carol of the Purple Gentian (Carol seems to associate well with Christmas, thanks to Dickens!) One more thing I like about suggestions is that Richard will now have a book named after him. Either that or if I could think of a name for Amy…….

  36. Faith on January 26, 2009 at 6:55 pm

    “First Christmas with the Spies”
    or just “Christmas with the Spies”

  37. Tanya T on January 26, 2009 at 6:57 pm

    However much I enjoy the title “A Very Selwick Christmas”, I do like the idea of “Espionage At Christmas”.

    or “Mayhem at Uppington House”

    I shall return after I ponder some more.

  38. Kit on January 26, 2009 at 7:08 pm

    How about “Under Uppington Eyes”
    or
    “The Tale of Two (or more) Spies . . .”

  39. Courtney P. on January 26, 2009 at 10:34 pm

    “The Masked Mistletoe”

    “The Bothersome Mistletoe”

    “The Escapade of the Masked Mistletoe”

  40. AngelB on January 26, 2009 at 11:00 pm

    The Merry Mayhem of an Uppington Hall Holiday

  41. Claire on January 26, 2009 at 11:23 pm

    “The Betrayal of the Christmas Lily”

  42. Tasha on January 27, 2009 at 1:28 am

    “The Holly, The Ivy and An Olive Branch”

  43. Tasha on January 27, 2009 at 1:37 am

    Ooops… forgot the explanation πŸ™‚

    In Medieval times, the Holly used to represent the male gender and the Ivy was the feminine counterpart. When found in the wild, the Ivy twines around the Holly tree, always fighting, and yet always together. It reminded me of how Richard and Amy are often at odds, but when it’s important, they always band together, and find peace…

  44. Joanna on January 27, 2009 at 1:10 pm

    The Revelation of the Christmas Ivy

  45. Joanna on January 27, 2009 at 1:13 pm

    I also like “The Offer of the Christmas Ivy”

  46. Samantha on January 27, 2009 at 2:35 pm

    I propose “The Return of the Christmas Violet”. But that puts the focus on Deirdre, and I like the other names that focus on the Selwicks. Hmm…further thought required.

  47. Courtney P. on January 27, 2009 at 3:24 pm

    The Christmas Ivy Triumph

    or
    my personal favorite….

    The Christmas Orchid Triumph

  48. Courtney P. on January 27, 2009 at 3:31 pm

    or even rearranging it

    The Triumph of the Christmas Orchid

    The Triumph of the Christmas Ivy

    The Triumph of the Christmas Holly

  49. Liz on January 27, 2009 at 4:27 pm

    All Through The House

  50. Elissa on January 27, 2009 at 6:03 pm

    The Intrigue of the Jaded Mistletoe.

    How the Selwick’s got their groove back

    The Rook of the Ivy Castle

    The Trickery of the Wilted Evergreen

  51. Cho on January 27, 2009 at 8:48 pm

    The Selwick Christmas Intrigue
    or
    Intrigue at Christmas

  52. AngelB on January 27, 2009 at 9:37 pm

    The Revelation of the Warming Pan
    The Conspiracy of the Mince Pie

    Okay, those are silly. πŸ™‚

  53. Karlene Barger on January 27, 2009 at 10:31 pm

    A Golden Poinsettia Christmas

  54. Debra Callaway on January 27, 2009 at 10:36 pm

    The Mata Hari reference would be too early. Mata Hari came up with her name 200+ years after this.
    As for titles:
    Richard and Amy: Christmas Confusion and Resolution,
    Mistletoe and Mince Pie,
    Just Another Spy in the Library, maybe I’ll come up with something better, I had one in mind last week but I forgot to write it down and now I can’t remember it, arrghhhh.

  55. MP on January 27, 2009 at 11:11 pm

    What about “A Selwick Christmas Masque”?
    I like the double entendre of “masque” as in “a production” (would you expect Christmas at the Selwick’s to be anything but?) and its homophone “mask”. Since most of the novella’s drama centers around the facades characters adopt, either for good (Richard pretending it would be ok if Amy went to France) or ill (Dierdre), and the ones we choose not to adopt (Amy decide to be honest rather than controlled), I thought it might fit nicely

  56. Hannah Renee on January 27, 2009 at 11:25 pm

    “The Vexation of the Gilded Mistletoe”
    There’s several elements to this one. The first would be vexation. It’s a short little story, so it isn’t full out chaos to do with Dierdre. At least, as far as we know. It’s truly vexing that Dierdre would do anything of the sort.

    Gilded is used because Richard has always made her up to be something she isn’t. He thought he loved her, to the point of staking his career on her. Yet when he falls in love with Amy he realizes just how much he wasn’t in love with Dierdre. Also, in the novella he makes her up to be something she isn’t: someone to be pitied. He tries to be nice to her, to be hospitable. Yet she wasn’t as honorable as he had believed, once again only being gold at the surface.

    Mistletoe here has a double meaning. While obviously it is a reference to Christmas and the fact that it is used throughout the novella, I also intend it as an allusion to Norse Mythology. Mistletoe was the only weakness of Balder, Dierdre is one of few true weaknesses to Richard throughout time. Richard trusts her, just as the gods trusted mistletoe. Of course, the French are Richard’s Loki, but we’re lucky that this particular bit of mistletoe was intercepted πŸ™‚

  57. Megan on January 27, 2009 at 11:50 pm

    Eggnog and Espionage: A Selwick Christmas Story
    (Even though there was no mention of eggnog..the mistletoe has been done to the hilt.)

    Ivy and Intrigue: A Very Selwick Christmas
    (What can I say, I just think the pairs/twosomes fit nicely : )

  58. Kit on January 28, 2009 at 12:57 am

    “The Appearance of the Spying Servant” as a play on the Biblical the appearance of the star over Bethlehem . . . kinda a stretch, but it keeps with the books titles

  59. Katie on January 28, 2009 at 1:05 am

    The Conspiracy of the poisonous poinsettia.

  60. Katie on January 28, 2009 at 1:13 am

    woops! I didn’t mean to send that yet…I also thought perhaps: A very Uppity Uppington Christmas.
    I thought The Conspiracy of the Poisounous Poinsettia was amusing becase Poinsettia’s are commonly inacurately discribed as being poisionous when infact they at most only cause minor stomach upset and are more of a nusance than a real problem;which reminded me of Deidre more annoying than really dangerous. Sorry, I digress I used to work for a florist in High School.

  61. Anne K on January 28, 2009 at 10:40 am

    while I am in agreement of keeping the working (if annoying) tittle, I am also completely jealous that I didn’t think of
    Ò€œThe Vexation of the Gilded MistletoeÒ€ ( by Hannah Renee) and “The Return of the Gold Narcissus” (by Courtney).

    As for my own suggestion, The Collar Reversible Cloak, I like the double meanings. Cloak meaning disguise and the apparel that the maid (or Deidre) wore here an in Black Tulip. Collar could refer to the neck attire or the apprehension. As for reversible, we have seen several faces to Deidre (sweet, incidental, duplicitous, jaded).

  62. Victoria on January 28, 2009 at 11:23 am

    The Mutiny of the White Narcissus

    Narcissus bulbs are “forced” to bloom in winter – how delicious if the White Narcissus (person) mutinies against all the the plotting and plannings of…

  63. Lauren Willig - News on January 28, 2009 at 12:23 pm

    […] other news, the Title That Blasted Novella! Contest is still up and […]

  64. Laura on January 28, 2009 at 12:51 pm

    “The Ruse of the White Poinsettia”

    referring to Deidre’s complexion and her deception.

    or
    “The Poisson of the White Poinsettia”.

    even though poinsettias aren’t necessarily poisonous to people, i’m sure Deidre gave Amy an upset stomach. and most people think they are anyway, so it goes with what people think. πŸ™‚
    ~lAUra

  65. Laura on January 28, 2009 at 12:53 pm

    whoops. i wrote French for fish instead of poison. lol!
    ~lAUra

  66. Diane on January 28, 2009 at 2:58 pm

    Here’s another title to add to the ever-growing list you have to look at. πŸ™‚

    “In the Shadows of the Mistletoe”.

  67. Sara M on January 28, 2009 at 3:48 pm

    I chose: “The Betrayal of the Yellow Thistle”

    I chose “Betrayal” because she betrayed Richard’s trust when she first told her maid about him, and moreover she betrayed her country.

    I chose “Thistle” as the flower because it’s thorny and there’s a Scottish Thistle (while it’s not English…I think it’s close enough) and it’s pink (identify with female).

    Finally, I chose “Yellow” because that’s a color of cowardice. And Deidre seems like a coward to me; anyone who spies against their own country and puts the lives of many patriots at risk (especially when it occured in the manner that Deidre began) is a coward.

  68. Casimira on January 28, 2009 at 5:49 pm

    The Nativity of the Holly and the Ivy?

  69. Victoria on January 28, 2009 at 5:50 pm

    Issues with Poinsettia – known until the mid 1830’s as cuetlaxochitl AZTEC name – native to Mexico not seen outside the country until introduced by American Joel Roberts Poinsett (US Ambassador to Mexico) in the mid 1830’s.

  70. Anna on January 28, 2009 at 6:27 pm

    Now, I will add my titles, hopefully to the correct screen.

    1) Betrayal Among the Halls of Holly
    2) Betrayal Among the Boughs
    3) Espionage and Auld Lang Syne

  71. Whitney Daly on January 28, 2009 at 8:45 pm

    Spying Under the Mistletoe.

  72. Whitney Daly on January 28, 2009 at 8:49 pm

    Secrets of the Mistletoe.
    or
    Spying Under the Mistletoe.
    or
    The Holly’s Hostage.
    or
    The Intrigue of the Ivy.

  73. Nicole on January 28, 2009 at 11:41 pm

    How about…
    The Intrigue with the Christmas Cactus
    The Ruse of the Christmas Rose
    An Intrigue Under the Mistletoe

  74. Laura on January 29, 2009 at 1:23 am

    The Lies of the Lavender Orchid

    (lavender is a symbol for distrust, orchids are elegance and associated with Christ and therefore, Christmas)

    The Folly of the Christmas Columbine

    (columbine is a symbol for foolishness)

    The Devotion of the Presumptuous Peppermint

    (peppermint is a symbol for warmth of feeling or love)

    i’m thinking about this too much. haha!
    ~lAUra

  75. Alyson on January 29, 2009 at 3:26 am

    I liked the Selwick Christmas title.
    The Threat of the Dandelion
    Only because it looks like a flower but really is only a weed

  76. Amy Mc on January 29, 2009 at 3:47 am

    How about “The Apprehension of the Christmas Jade”? “Apprehension” here meaning both Deidere’s capture and Richard’s coming to understand what she is. And “Jade”, if a bit archaic, meaning a false, disreputable, or vicious woman…

  77. Megan on January 29, 2009 at 10:02 am

    The Sting [or Prick] of the Christmas Thistle

  78. Elissa on January 29, 2009 at 5:06 pm

    The Swindle of the Snowy Carriage

    The Fleece of the Ebony Cloak

    The Affair of the Christmas Ivy

    The Capture of the Golden Poppy

    The Deceit of the Amber Candle

  79. Diane on January 29, 2009 at 5:58 pm

    How about “The Deception among the Mistletoe”? (I seem to be stuck on mistletoe, holly and ivy). Or “The Malice under the Mistletoe”?

  80. Laura on January 29, 2009 at 6:58 pm

    ooo. nice one megan. i like The Prick of the Christmas Thistle.
    ~lAUra

  81. Beena on January 29, 2009 at 7:31 pm

    What about a Spy for Christmas…

  82. Beena on January 29, 2009 at 7:36 pm

    A Selwick Christmas Story

  83. Sara M on January 29, 2009 at 7:50 pm

    Dang Megan! Totally stole my thistle suggestion!

    Just kidding πŸ™‚

    It really is the perfect plant for her!

  84. Megan on January 29, 2009 at 10:02 pm

    Ah shucks. It did seem pretty perfect for her though.
    (Hope I didn’t really steal it, Sara M!)

  85. Hannah on January 29, 2009 at 10:51 pm

    Secrets Under Mistletoe

  86. AngelB on January 29, 2009 at 10:56 pm

    Okay, finally have a real answer (my others were a bit silly).

    The Apprehension of the Snow Rose

  87. Joanna on January 30, 2009 at 1:17 pm

    The Hunt for the Holiday Holly

  88. Sara M on January 30, 2009 at 2:49 pm

    Oh Megan! I was just kidding πŸ™‚

    I posted it a couple posts before yours! I was just joking with you πŸ™‚

  89. Megan on January 30, 2009 at 3:44 pm

    Well, I guess “Pink” minds think alike!

  90. MrsLee on January 30, 2009 at 4:05 pm

    The Distraction of the Christmas Flowers

  91. Joanna on January 30, 2009 at 4:43 pm

    The Gathering of the Christmas Bouquet
    (since there are so many flowers present)

  92. Sara M on January 30, 2009 at 6:35 pm

    Good one Megan!

  93. Victoria on January 31, 2009 at 12:52 am

    The Return of the Christmas Star

  94. Victoria on January 31, 2009 at 8:56 am

    The Memoir of the Purple Gentian

    The swashbuckling Purple Gentain tells his own tale concerning one specific Selwick Christmas…

  95. Lauren Willig - News on January 31, 2009 at 12:34 pm

    […] mea culpa? To give my Board of Advisers time to weigh in on the entries, I’m extending the contest until Monday, at which point– I promise, promise, promise– finalists will be posted and […]

  96. Chloe on January 31, 2009 at 2:44 pm

    The Misunderstanding of the Holly and Ivy.
    or
    A Very Flowery Christmas.
    or
    An Understanding Under the Mistletoe. (because under the mistletoe is where Amy and Richard resolve their dilemma.)
    or
    A Havoc Filled Holiday.

  97. Chloe on January 31, 2009 at 6:12 pm

    Sorry to Morgan. I did not realize you had already used the title:
    The Misunderstanding of the Holly and Ivy.

  98. Elisabeth on January 31, 2009 at 6:42 pm

    Christmas Revival

    Amy and Richard are reviving their spy lives and renewing their commitment to each other as a result of the events during Christmas.

  99. Elizabeth on January 31, 2009 at 7:19 pm

    okay, so this probably isn’t the *best* title ever but…

    The Defeat of the Venus Fly Trap!
    (With Deidre being the Venus Fly Trap…)

    Hey! I tried, right?

  100. Debra Callaway on January 31, 2009 at 8:41 pm

    here’s some more ideas for the title:

    Fools Gold and Warming Pans

    (fools gold being a reference to the young Richard’s foolish infatuation and Deirdre’s golden hair and D’s folly in believing she can get information from Richard because he once cared),

    or Fools Gold and Mistletoe

    The Flowery Fracas at Uppington Hall,

    Frosty Receptions

    Mistletoe and Misunderstandings

    Revelations Under the Mistletoe

  101. Catherine on January 31, 2009 at 8:43 pm

    The Assembly {/Intrigue?} of the First Noel

    I Think it rather works dont you with the french references and all?

    (and I think I should win because I live in New Zealand and wont be able to read the new book until my library orders it in from america – with the crimson rose it was July before I got a look in!)

  102. Kevin Verdon on January 31, 2009 at 8:48 pm

    How about “The Secret Berries of the Mistletoe”?

  103. Kevin Verdon on January 31, 2009 at 8:49 pm

    or “The First Cutting of the Holly and the Ivy”

  104. Faith on January 31, 2009 at 9:07 pm

    “The Mistletoe Conspiracy”

  105. Hannah on January 31, 2009 at 11:20 pm

    I think I submitted one before but I was in an alliteration mood and thought of The Confusion of the Christmas Caper

  106. Elizabeth on January 31, 2009 at 11:56 pm

    A Christmas Corsage
    An Amoral Amaryllis

  107. Elizabeth on February 1, 2009 at 1:37 am

    Espionage & Edelweiss

  108. Anna on February 1, 2009 at 3:39 am

    Old Habits Die Hard

    or

    Spies Below the Mistletoe

  109. Katelin on February 1, 2009 at 5:38 pm

    The disillusionment of the Purple Gentian.
    or
    The Peppermint Peccadillo

  110. Katelin on February 1, 2009 at 5:40 pm

    Oh or The Precarious Proposition of the Purple Gentian.

  111. Elizabeth aka Miss Eliza on February 1, 2009 at 10:18 pm

    OK, here’s my last few, and this is it I swear πŸ˜›

    My Favourites:
    The Violet of Half-Mourning
    Before Twelfth Night
    Widows Weeds
    The Nimbus of Narcissus
    A Lost Way of Life

    Others:
    Consorting With Agents
    A Certain Lady J-
    A Crown of Prickley Holly
    One Agitated Sheep
    Shifting Snow
    The Holly Bears a Prickle
    Bother the Snow

  112. AngelB on February 1, 2009 at 11:26 pm

    Figured I didn’t like Christmas Rose because it’s too close to Crimson Rose so I’m changing mine:

    The Yuletide Apprehension of the Pendulous Blossoms.

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